Astronaut Extroadinaire: Nicholas Floyd

Dec 30, 2018
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Name: Nicholas "Nick" Floyd
Race: Human
Age: God knows! He thinks he's 32, but chronologically he's around 1170.
Date of Birth: Feb 21st, 1939
So what's his story, huh?
Let's start from the most important part. He's an astronaut who had been selected for an experimental flight of a modified prototype for the in-development Space Shuttle program. The year is 1971, and it's 9:26AM at the Kennedy Space Centre, Florida.
Nicholas climbs into the experimental shuttle, his three other crewmen and himself expecting an ordinary orbital flight to test the seperation of the early Shuttle's thrusters.

All goes well and under plan until the shuttle's fuel tank is seperated, when suddenly the shuttle begins to lock its' navigation onto the outer asteroid belt! Suddenly, when the crew had thought the fuel should've been out, the shuttle begins to thrust its' way out of the Earth's orbit and hurtles through the system at speeds unpresidented for such an era!

Ground control have lost contact, and all seems hopeless for our crew. The shuttle is speeding further, and further away from its' target, and begins to reach speeds faster than light itself. That's when it hit them.

They weren't there as a merry team of astronauts, but rather they were labrats for NASA's FTL research. But it's too late now.

The ship begins to travel at such a speed where seconds become days, hours become years and days become centuries. Nick and his team aren't just travelling through space, but more or less through time...

What seems like a year to them has passed, and most of Nick's team have starved to death. Only Nick remains, through extreme rationing and careful planning. He doesn't know how long he'll be there, but he knows he's too far from home now. To him, it must be 1972. But to the universe, it's 3124..

The ship begins to slow down. The experiment has concluded, in a complete failure. His fuel's out, and he's starving. As the shuttle drifts through an unknown system, it is pulled into orbit of an unknown, strange planet.
A planet with seas as big as continents, islands galore.
1285
 
Dec 3, 2018
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Why did NASA need labrats if they could clearly do the launch remotely from control without human assistance?
 
Dec 3, 2018
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Nor they needed to, coords were locked in, navigation was both impossible for the crew (otherwise one would've just re-adjusted it) and unecessary for NASA, humans were not required for the experiment, a simple shuttle with coords already locked in would've sufficed.
I like the concept but that plot hole makes me uneasy.
 
Dec 3, 2018
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Buddy, im just pointing stuff out hoping theres an explanation behind it like I do everytime i read a book and something doesn't click. I aint freaking out over it, just found a nice backstory with some inconsistencies and wanted to bring it up.

You free not to answer them it's your story after all.
 
Jan 12, 2019
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Generally, that's called feedback, and people tend to use it to make their stories better or more to the taste of their audience. You can take feedback however you want, it's just his take on your story, so there's no need to have an escalation.

As he said himself, you're free not to answer to it, since that story is ultimatly for you to shape and redesign.